Peter Chandley

Unfortunately we have to share some sad news, Peter Chandley, the Chair of the Friends of the Hyde Park Picture House and a regular at the cinema, passed away late last year.

We are thankful to his cousin, Margaret Francis, for sharing some stories about Peter with us which we have brought together here alongside some thoughts from the Friends of Hyde Park Committee.

Peter was born on July 20th, 1953 and was adopted a month later by Marjorie (Lawrence) and Herbert Chandley. Marjorie owned a small haberdashery shop that also sold children’s clothes before her marriage and Herbert served in the war. He late became a teacher who taught woodworking. Marjorie and Bert lived in a bungalow in Windsor, then moved to a house in Frinton on-sea when Peter came into their lives and they cherished him dearly.

Peter attended Children’s Special Service Mission (CSSM) on the beach every morning during the school summer holidays. This helped build a strong bond with his faith which was important to him throughout his life.

After school Peter went on to attend teachers college and it was this that brought him to Leeds. When his training finished, he came to settle in the city, living around the Armley area for much of his adult life.

We’re not sure when Peter first visited the Picture House but he worked for a time in the Hyde Park Area as a teacher at the Royal Park Primary school on Queens Road. There he touched the lives of many young families in the area and built a relationship with our community which would extend to his active involvement in the Friends of Hyde Park Picture House from its establishment in 1984.

Peter loved trains, especially steam trains and he sought out and enjoyed rising as many as he could in the UK. He also loved horror films, science fiction and fantasy and comic books. He was an avid collector of the latter and enjoyed many of the recent comic book adaptations.

This might seem a contrast to his lifelong commitment to the Church but these lovely dichotomies are one of the wonderful things to remember about Peter who was actively involved in the Christ Church, Upper Armley, in his adult life. It is perhaps this community which will remember him most fondly alongside our own.

Peter was Chair of the Friends since 2008 and was a valuable voice in the group. Always positive, kind and thoughtful, Peter carried with him so much of the cinema’s story. Not just the tale of our bricks and mortar but the people who had been so key to it over the years and the story of the Friends itself which is the story of the saving of the cinema. He was also a keen supporter of other local cinemas, The Hebden Bridge Picture House, the Rex at Elland. By bus and train he would traverse Yorkshire looking for the right film at the right time. Always a cheerful hello and a friendly smile, it’s impossible to know how many people he came to know in these travels.

We are sad beyond words to think of the stories which are lost with Peter’s passing. In the telling of the story of the Picture House he is a chapter we are lucky to be able to cherish.

“So why do we spend all the time we do on the Hyde Park, this one little Cinema. Well because we care about it in the world of multiplexes but we can’t afford to be complacent as I used to go to the Lyric cinema for many years but it closed and few remember it today. We know the Hyde Park is a very special place which provides a unique venue for watching the films from the oldest silent show, the foreign and all the other unusual films which don’t get shown very much anywhere else, to the special shows as well as all the other films. We have something to be very proud of and where would we go to if it wasn’t there.”

Peter Chandley 1953 – 2018

Capernaum (Lebanon, USA 2018)

Showing from Friday 1st March

Capernaum was the winner of the Leeds International Film Festival 2018 Best Fiction Feature film award, and was nominated for an Oscar (Academy Awards Best Foreign Language Film 2019).

“I wish my parents had never had me!”

“Capernaum” is often used to mean “chaos” in French literature. It is also the name of an ancient Palestinian city on the northwest shore of the Sea of Galilee where Jesus Christ is said to have performed miracles. Times are tough for undocumented people who end up in Beirut slums. And I mean tough! Life is about getting by … life surrounded by hunger, petty crime, violence, forced marriage, detention centres, as well as some compassion. If you saw Slumdog Millionaire (2008), that was a bit cosy by comparison. Capernaum shows abject poverty where people have no legal way out.

Without papers you are nothing in the eyes of the authorities. Lebanese director Nadine Labaki understands the brutal reality of life there. Most of the cast are novice actors from the neighbourhood who draw on their personal experience. Zain (Zain al-Rafeea) is a streetwise 12 year old, a survivor who is close to his younger sister Sahar (Haita ‘Cedra’ Izzam). During the story Zain joins forces with an Ethiopian migrant worker Rahil (Yordanos Shiferaw) and her baby son Yonas (Boluwatife Treasure Bankole ).

Don’t let this harsh background put you off seeing a very good film! You will also see humanity, resilience and love amongst the prevailing political, social and economic injustices. Personally I have gained so much from films that offer glimpses into the lives and struggles of people across the world. Just a few examples:

  • Taxi Tehran (2015) made despite a ban by the Iranian authorities;
  • The Act of Killing (2013) about mass killings in Indonesia;
  • Speed Sisters (2017) about Palestine’s all-women racing car team;
  • The Journey (2017) about a suicide bomber in Baghdad;
  • A Cambodian Spring (2016) popular resistance to forced evictions
  • Fukushima, Mon Amour (2016) about people living in the shadow of nuclear meltdown
  • Félicité (2017) about a singer in Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo) trying to get medical treatment for her son
  • Human Flow (2017) Ai Weiwei’s film gives a global context to the struggles of displaced people
  • I, Daniel Blake (2016) reminds us that the UK is not exempt from such dehumanising treatment.

We are indebted to the directors who use their skills to tell such stories, sometimes at great personal risk, and always with the huge challenges of assembling the necessary funding, gathering a film crew, and arranging production and distribution. Fortunately there are growing numbers of them thanks in part to iPhone cameras, drones, and support from international groups. Films like Capernaum contribute in their own way to moves towards an urgent search for meaning and identity across the globe and illustrate results of conflicts, some of which are prosecuted in our names.

Capernaum is showing at the Hyde Park Picture House from Friday March 1st to Thursday March 7th inclusive.


Bill Walton

The Lost Honour of Katharina Blum / Die verlorene Ehre der Katharina Blum (West Germany, 1975)

Tuesday February 26th at 6.00 p.m.

This film also caries a sub-title, ‘How violence develops and where it can lead’. This suggests one of the themes that are central to the story. Set in Germany at the time when the activities of the Red Army Faction led to increasing repressive laws and a campaign approaching hysteria in the mainstream media, this film counterposes individual liberties against powerful state and commercial institutions. The titular heroine is caught up in a web of media and state scrutiny. The tragic developments in her world taken her far from her original situation.

The film was both scripted and directed by the then partners, Volker Schlöndorff and Margarethe von Trotta. Both are key members of the New German Cinema of the period. The story is adapted from a novel by Heinrich Böll, himself a radical leader in the German literary world. The novel has also been adapted as a television film, a radio drama and an opera.

The novel opens with a line that Wikipedia quotes:

“The characters and action in this story are purely fictitious. Should the description of certain journalistic practices result in a resemblance to the practices of Bild-Zeitung, such resemblance is neither intentional, nor fortuitous, but unavoidable.” [Bild-Zeitung is a tabloid daily published by Axel Sprinter A.G.].

A similar but somewhat different line appears in the end credits of the film.

This suggests how closely the film criticises actual German media and institutions. Here it follows the novel after Boll himself suffered as a target by the German press. The film follows the plot of the novel in offering an increasing melodramatic story. But it also offers a sensitive portrayal of the young female victim at it’s heart, played with conviction by Angela Winkler.

Offering stories that have a basis in real life and history is a hall mark of the film work of Margarethe von Trotta. This title is one of four in a retrospective programme distributed by the Independent Cinemas Office. The Picture House has already screened the powerful biopic of Rosa Luxemburg. The other two films in the programme are her first solo feature The Second Awakening of Christa Klages / Das zweite Erwachen der Christa Klages (1978) and The German Sisters / Die bleierne Zeit (1981). The latter is a classic of the New German Cinema. Both will screen at the Picture House, The German Sisters on March 10th.

This title, now transferred to a DCP, runs for 106 minutes and includes English sub-titles.

Groundhog Day (USA 1993)

Saturday 2nd February 10:30pm

Phil Connors (Bill Murray): Excuse me, where is everybody going?
Fan on Street: To Gobbler’s Knob. It’s Groundhog Day!

Groundhog Day is a popular annual tradition celebrated in Punxsutawney, western Pennsylvania. Groundhogs hibernate each winter. The superstition is that if the groundhog (Punxsutawney Phil) emerges from his burrow on February 2nd and sees a shadow due to clear weather, he will retreat into his den and winter will persist for six more weeks; and if he does not see his shadow because of cloudiness, spring will arrive early.

TV weather presenter Phil Connors, news producer Rita Hanson (Andie MacDowell) and camera operator Larry (Chris Elliott) have the task of covering the festivities for a Pittsburgh TV station. In Punxsutawney the Pennsylvania Polka is playing. The weather is extremely cold. And clearly a day in the little town of Punxsutawney is not Phil Connors’ idea of fun.

Phil: This is one time where television really fails to capture the true excitement of a large squirrel predicting the weather.

The film Groundhog Day is a popular romantic comedy set in a an attractive small town that is a character in itself (actual location Woodstock, Illinois).

But there’s a lot more to Director Harold Ramis’s film than that.

I expect you know already, so I’ll risk a spoiler. After all the film is largely responsible for popularising the phrase ‘Groundhog Day’ in the UK.

I expect you know already, so I’ll risk a spoiler: Some events in the film “are or appear to be continually repeated”, trapping Phil in a time loop that no one else is aware of.

Phil: What would you do if you were stuck in one place and every day was exactly the same, and nothing that you did mattered?
Ralph (Rick Overton): That about sums it up for me.

Some viewers interpret the film according to their own philosophies, creeds and religions, with enthusiasts ranging from Buddhists, fundamentalist Christians, and Nietzschean nihilists, to transcendental yogis and Hasidic Jews. The film is called “Black Hole of Love’ In South Korea. Whether you’re looking for purgatory, reincarnation, mitzvahs, or karma, you will probably find what you seek.

Other fans may see echoes of Elisabeth Kubler-Ross’s five stages of grief and loss as Phil Connors struggles to come to terms with his situation.

And some of us will simply sit back with our popcorn to enjoy an excellent cast, a snowy festival, and a little food for thought. After all, if you could live forever, if your actions seemed to have no consequences, how would you change yourself over time? Would you live your life well? Could you find anything to make this seemingly never-ending daily routine stop?

Phil: Well, it’s Groundhog Day… again…

This year Groundhog Day will repeat itself at the Hyde Park Picture House on Saturday February 2nd at 10.30pm.


Bill Walton

Rosa Luxemburg, Germany 1986

Tuesday January 15 at 6 p.m.

This is a welcome screening of one of the fine political dramas written and directed by Margarethe von Trotta. Rosa Luxemburg was one of the outstanding revolutionaries of the early C20th. Along with Lenin and the Bolsheviks and the suffragist Sylvia Pankhurst she adhered to the central platform of Marx and Engels’ position on capitalist war. This was the outcome of years of struggle in her native Poland and in the German Social Democratic Party for ‘Revolution’ against ‘reformism’. Her political activity led to numerous spells of imprisonment and finally her murder after the failed Spartacist uprising in 1919.

[see the recent demonstration in her memory].

Red Rosa now has vanished too. (…)

She told the poor what life is about,

And so the rich have rubbed her out.

May she rest in peace. “[Bertolt Brecht].

Von Trotta’s film opens in prison in 1916 and then takes the viewer back to 1906 and a Polish prison. Cutting in time and space between different periods of Rosa’s life and political action the film presents a complex and dramatic biography. Barbara Sukowa, a long-time collaborator with von Trotta gives a compelling characterisation of this committed and steely woman. The film brings out both the importance of Rosa political activity and the rich but demanding personal life she enjoyed.

The production team includes a number of von Trotta’s regular collaborator. Visually this is a tour de force and the team also manages to capture the look and detail of the years before World War I. When the film moves to the later years of the imperialist war and the post-war failed revolution the judicious use of archive footage integrates the personal life with the seismic social events.

This is a engaging and fascinating biopic and treatment of political events that are as relevant today. Rosa’s own ‘Reform or Revolution’ is as an apt a commentary for 2008 as it was for 1900.

Margarethe von Trotta is one of the outstanding German directors of recent decades. Along with fellow women film-makers she will be part of a retrospective at the forthcoming Berlinale. The Independent Cinema Office are distributing this film [in digital versions] with three other titles: The Lost Honour of Katharina Blum / Die verlorene Ehre der Katharina Blum (1975): The Second Awakening of Christa Klages / Das zweite Erwachen der Christa Klages: The German Sisters / Die bleierne Zeit. Let us hope we are able to see these three as well.

Five 2018 highlights from Hyde Park Picture House

‘Rey’

Selected by Jake:

Rey

The year started really strong with this Chilean curio, a surrealist biography of self proclaimed King of Araucania and Patagonia, Orélie-Antoine de Tounens. Intriguingly, the film was shot on 16mm and the canisters were buried then edited in different stages of decomposition, which gave it a feeling of a past being (literally) unearthed. FFO Andrew Kötting and Alejandro Jodorowsky.

120 BPM

Possibly this year’s most affecting film, which follows AIDS activists in early 90s Paris. The rousing scenes of protest and then the nighttime raves which follow bleed into each other, set to an amazing soundtrack of hypnotic and strangely melancholic House music. I was left reeling.

Zama

Brilliant absurdist pitch-black comedy from celebrated Argentinian filmmaker, Lucrecia Martel. The story follows a colonial officer who’s life becomes a Kafkaesque nightmare as he tries to get a transfer from a desolate outpost somewhere on the Paraguay River.

Leave No Trace

Probably the most striking coming-of-age story I came across this year. A homeless father and daughter are found living illegally in a national park in Oregon, and the film shows them being reintegrated into society. As the narrative continues, we begin to see their paths diverging and it blindsides you with overwhelming poignancy.

Milford Graves: Full Mantis

A music documentary that truly honors its fascinating subject; the pioneering improvisational drummer and polymath, Milford Graves. Directors Jake Meginsky and Neil Young ingeniously mirror the intuitive outlook of a genuine eccentric in the textures and rhythms of their film.

 

2018 at the Hyde Park Picture House.

‘The Wild Pear Tree’

I thought this was a stronger year for new releases than 2017. Two of my favourites screened at the Leeds International Film Festival and then, subsequently, at the Picture House.

Shoplifters / Manbiki kazoku (Japan, 2018). This is a real cinematic treasure. The subject is welcome and a little subversive. The production is excellent in every aspect.

The Wild Pear Tree / Ahlat Agaci, (Turkey | Republic of Macedonia | France / Germany | Bosnia and Herzegovina | Bulgaria | Sweden, 2018. An epic film, certainly in length, but immensely rewarding if you stayed the course.

Then the new titles on general or limited release;

Jupitor’s Moon / Jupiter holdja, (Hungary / Germany / France, 2017). This was a sort of ‘magic realism’ following an illegal migrant trying to survive in an unwelcoming environment.

Sweet Country, (Australia, 2017). A fine ‘outback film’ set in the 1920s. Apart from the excellent characters and plot we had a glimpse a ‘silent film’ screening.

Isle of Dogs, (Germany / USA, 2018). Fine animation and the canine performances of the year.

Zama, (Argentina / Brazil / Spain / Dominican Republic / France / Netherlands / Mexico / Switzerland / USA / Portugal / Lebanon, 2017). I enjoyed this so much that I must find time to read the novel from which it is sourced.

Wajib (Palestine / France / Colombia / Germany / United Arab Emirates / Qatar / Norway, 2017) A master-class in how to make a fascination story out of a drive and delivery of wedding invitations.

‘Wajib’

There were two fine documentaries this year:

The Rape of Recy Taylor, (USA, 2017) Set among African-American women exploited and oppressed in the pre-civil rights era. The use of archive material was so imaginative.

Faces Places / Visages villages (France, 2017) An in idiosyncratic delight.

We also had a lot of classics. The Ida Lupino programme was welcome and mainly on 35mm. High Sierra (USA 1941) and Outrage (USA 1950)stood out.

And we had a good 35mm print of Isaac Julien’s Young Soul Rebels (Britain 1991).

The one serious omission of the year was The Young Karl Marx / Le jeune Karl Marx (France / Belgium / Germany, 2017), a really well done drama of the early years and work of Marx and Friedrich Engels, and with Jenny Marx and Mary Burns.

Friedrich, Jenny, Karl, Mary and family

Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, Spain 1988

New Year’s Eve Double-Bill
Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown & 9 to 5

Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown

QUESTION:Take an intense world of machismo, voiceovers, red gazpacho,  answering machines, love triangles, Arab terrorists, and a mambo taxi driver who puts Uber to shame. To this vivid background add a vibrant cast of women crazed with love, along with a nosey secretary, a Jehovah’s Witness, two policemen and the telephone repair guy. What do you get?

ANSWER: Spanish filmmaker Pedro Almodóvar’s smart, funny and touching international breakthrough film. A feast of style, colour, and music. ‘Nervous breakdown’ may not be quite the right translation for the Spanish ‘Ataques de nervios’; but look out for dramatic outpourings of negative emotions, bodily gestures occasional falling to the ground, and fainting, often in response to receiving disturbing news or witnessing or participating in an upsetting event. (Thanks, Wikipedia, for the clarification.)

Ana (Ana Leza) : I’m fed up. I’m gonna get myself some quick cash, buy
myself his bike and split. With a bike, who needs a man?
Pepa (Carmen Maura): Learning mechanics is easier than learning male
psychology. You can figure out a bike, but you can never figure out a man.

Almodóvar’s film doesn’t quite pass the Bechdel test for representation of women in fiction, but it comes pretty damn close. (More than two named women ✔︎; who talk to each other ✔︎; about something besides a man – some of the time).

Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown takes place mostly in a snazzy Madrid penthouse. Pepa wants to know where her lover Iván (Fernando Guillén) is because she has to tell him something, Over a hectic 48 hours. Pepa, her friend Candela (María Barranco), Iván, Lucia (Julieta Serrano), Carlos (Antonio Banderas), Marisa (Rossy de Palma), and Paulina (Kiti Mánver) gradually figure out their relationships to each other. Spoiler alert: expect the unexpected.

Iván: How many men have you had to forget?
Pepa: As many as the women you remember.

Surely you deserve a bit of fun. On New Year’s Eve at 4pm put the trials and tribulations of 2018 behind you; treat yourselves to a beer or glass of wine from the Picture House kiosk; and prepare for the trials and tribulations (and successes) of 2019, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown is being shown as double-bill with 9 to 5 (1980) which features Lily Tomlin, Dolly Parton and Jane Fonda.


Bill Walton

Meet Me in St Louis, USA 1944.

Sunday December 16th at 5.30 p.m. Friends of the HPPH Xmas screening.

This is the Friends’ Christmas movie though technically it is not a seasonal film The plot actually covers the summer of 1903, then autumn, winter and spring. However, the Christmas sequence is one of the most memorable in the film, indeed in all Hollywood. It is full of seasonal tropes and motifs and features the wonderful ‘Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas’. The film is a musical and one of the classics produced by the M-G-M Studio.

The plot follows the domestic and romantic developments in the household of Mr Alonzo Smith (Leon Ames) and Mrs Anna Smith (Mary Astor). Their family includes four daughters; Rose (Lucille Bremer), Esther (Judy Garland), Agnes (Joan Carroll and “Tootsie” (Margaret O’Brien). There is a single son, Lon Jr. (Henry H. Daniels, Jr.). There is also a youthful Grandpa (Harry Davenport) and a maid with a tart tongue, Katie (Marjorie Main).

The cast are excellent and one of the great pleasures of the film. Judy Garland, in her nineteenth feature, is in her youthful and vibrant mode rather than the darker and more emotional tone of her later years. Her songs are done with accomplishment, especially my favourite ‘The Trolley Song’. Margaret O’Brien, in her tenth film, is a well-practised scene stealer but always entertaining. The story does tend to sentiment but Marjorie Main’s Katie continually inserts a more caustic note. The beaux of Rose and of Esther are not quite as interesting as the girls [neither in Lon Jr.), but this is [among other things] a woman’s picture.

Much of the film is in bright sunshine and vibrant Technicolor. But autumn introduces a darker tone with some fine chiaroscuro. And winter offers both twilight scenes and plenty of snow. The director, Vincente Minnelli, is a fine craftsman and he is a master of musical genre; he would later direct The Pirate (1948) and An American in Paris (1951). Early in his career he was a production designer and Minnelli makes use of splendid mise en scène and has a preference for fine travelling shots. In this he is aided by the excellent craft personnel of M-G-M. The Art Direction is by Lemuel Ayres, Cedric Gibbons and Jack Martin Smith; the Set Decorations are by Edwin B. Willis with the costumes designed by Sharaff. They all look and meld beautifully. The cinematography is by George Folsey, who had a long and distinguished career. The Technicolor is excellent and the sequence shots are finely smooth; watch the way the camera handles the opening number, ‘Meet Me in St Louis’.

The screenplay was adapted from a series of short stories by Irving Brecher and Fred F. Finklehoff. They have succeeded in blending these into a complete and integrated story. The songs are a medley from many sources including that of the 1904 Great Exhibition with which the film ends. Most of the score was adapted by Roger Edens but clearly also involved Arthur Freed. Freed is the guiding spirit behind the cycle of classic films from M-G-M, of which this is one of the finest.

The film was a major success on release, coming second in the annual box office. It received four nominations in the Academy Awards though it failed to win one. However, since then it has been listed among the American Film Institute’s ‘Greatest American Musicals’ and two of the musical numbers made it into the AFI’s ‘100 years … 100 songs’. It remains a perennial, classic. 113 minutes of pleasure in glorious colour, songs and unrivalled Hollywood production values. Happily the film is screening from a 35mm print so it can be enjoyed in its original format.

Shoplifters / Manbiki kazoku, Japan 2018

From Friday December 7th until Thursday December 13th

This film was the worthy winner of the Palme d’Or at Cannes this year and of the the Asia Pacific Screen Award for Best Feature Film. It came fourth in the Audience voting at the Leeds International Film Festival; to my mind an underestimate. I rate it one of the three or four best films released this year.

The film is was written, directed and edited by Koreeda Hirokazu. His previous films include the very fine Our Little Sister / Umimachi Diary (2015) and I Wish / Kiseki (2011). Like his earlier films this fits into a cycle of titles that explore representations of the family. Koreeda has done this in a variety of genres but the films all fit into a Japanese genre known by scholars as ‘shomin-geki’, the lives of the common or ordinary people. A major influence here, acknowledged by Koreeda, are the films of Naruse Mikio, one of the masters of classical Japanese cinema. Both directors present portraits of people from the petit-bourgeois, working class and, even the lumpen-proletariat.

The title of this new film describes an activity practised by the main characters. But there is much more to the film than this. As in his other films the cast are excellent and the characterizations and the relationships between kith and kin are both fascinating and complex. The film is realist but with elements of melodrama and moments of intense emotion.

The production values are great. Both the cinematography by Kondo Ryuto and the music by Haruomi Hosono are visually and aurally impressive. The title screens from a DCP but was filmed on 35mm and several digital formats, including Arri and Canon cameras. There are particular moments of superimpositions and one very fine overhead shot that recall the recent The Third Murder / Sandome no satsujin (2017) and the earlier Our Little Sister. This film is in colour, standard widescreen and has English subtitles. It runs 121 minutes. I cannot think of a better two hours spent at the moment.

If you have never seen a film by Naruse Mikio the BFI do have a 35mm print of his 1964 title Yearning / Midareru. This not only has a fine narrative but is graced by the presence of the great Japanese star Takamine Hideko. To see this would be a treat and an interesting comparison with the work of Koreeda.